Image 01

BELIEF 2014
3rd International Conference on Belief Functions

 

               

       
Conference Venue

Conference venue: St. Hugh's College

The Belief 2014 Conference will take place in the beautiful St. Hugh's college, University of Oxford.



All Oxford colleges can boast of their distinguished history and St Hugh's is no exception. Founded in 1886, the College is now one of the largest in Oxford, with a total of around 600 undergraduate and graduate students and around 50 Fellows working in a wide range of subjects. St Hugh's was established to offer an Oxford education to women and the first students at St Hugh's had to fight hard for their education. Things are different now, but the College still has a strong sense of its radical tradition, and of the importance of opening Oxford up to all who would do well here.

The College boasts a lecture theater able to host up to 200 delegates, and a number of boardrooms for poster sessions.



St. Hugh's conference brochure

Location

St. Hugh's College is located in St. Margaret's road, north of Oxford's city center.



Satellite view of St. Hugh's premises. The conference's main lecture theatre is located in the Maplethorpe building.



Map of the college:



About Oxford

Oxford is located in central southern England, about 60 miles from Central London. It is the county town of Oxfordshire, has a population of 150,200 and lies within the Oxford metropolitan area with a population of 244,000. Oxford has a diverse economic base. Its industries include motor manufacturing, education, publishing and a large number of information technology and science-based businesses.
The city is known worldwide as a university town and home of the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the country and in the English-speaking world. Buildings in Oxford demonstrate examples of every English architectural period since the arrival of the Saxons, including the iconic, mid-18th-century Radcliffe Camera. Oxford is known as the "city of dreaming spires", a term coined by poet Matthew Arnold in his poem Thyrsis, referring to the harmonious architecture of Oxford's university buildings.

Useful links

Oxford Wikipedia entry:



Oxford city guide